No. 37 – A Sunday Walk by Windsor Castle

Last Sunday we walked with friends into Windsor via the Long Walk.  The Long Walk extends south from Windsor Castle’s George IV Gate to the Copper Horse, a landmark statue that sits at the summit of Snow Hill, a distance of 2.7 miles from Windsor Castle.

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The Southern Aspect of Windsor Castle and the Round Tower

A favourite view of Windsor Castle taken from the Long Walk. The Round Tower was originally Norman, however it was rebuilt by Henry II in 1170.  Further remodelling work was carried out by King George IV in 1820 to create the iconic tower we see today.

August sunshine has brought out many visitors to are enjoying this spectacular walk.

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Royal Mausoleum at Frogmore

Immediately following the death of Prince Albert in 1861, Queen Victoria ordered the construction of a Royal Mausoleum to be built in the grounds of Frogmoor House.  Paid for by the Queen herself, the mausoleum commenced construction in March 1862 and was consecrated in the following December.  Both Prince Albert and Queen Victoria are interred here together with many other members of their family buried in the Royal Cemetery adjoining the Mausoleum.

Many Kings and Queens of England rest in St Georges Chapel, particularly since the creation of a Royal Vault by King George III.  Following the death of KIng George VI  who was laid to rest in the Royal Vault in February 1952., the King George VI Memorial Chapel was created within St Georges Chapel and the King’s remains were transferred here.  Both Queen Elizabeth the Queen Mother and Princess Margret, mother and sister of our present Queen also rest here.

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An Elegant Way to Travel

For those that don’t want to walk, a horse and carriage can be hired.

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Approaching Cambridge Gate, King George’s Gateway and Park Street Gate

As we near the end of the Long Walk there are three important gates. Towards the end of the Long Walk, providing private access to Windsor Castle, is Cambridge Gate.  Behind Cambridge Gate, nestling between two towers is King George IV Gateway.  The public leave the Long Walk via Park Street Gate  into Park Street, one of Windsor’s most elegant streets.  Just by Park Street Gate can be found The Two Brewers, a hostelry of considerable popularity.  Starting life as a coffee house in the 17th century,  The Two Brewers is well worth a visit for good food or even just a drink.  Beware though this pub is very small and often full to capacity.

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King George IV Gateway

King George IV Gateway is seen here, leading into the Upper Ward in the heart of Windsor Castle.  The archway seen behind is the entrance into the State Apartments. The soldier seen on guard in the sentry box to the left of the entrance is from the Household Division and is one of several guards posted around the castle

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Copper Horse in Silhouette

Because the sun was so strong it was not possible to photograph the Long Walk to the south up to the Copper Horse.  This is an image I made some time ago, taken just below the statue at the top of Snow Hill.  Again the sun was strong but enabled me to create the Copper Horse in silhouette.  The statue is of King George III on horseback commissioned by his son King George IV and sculptured by Sir Richard Westmacott in 1829.  Visitors to the statue will note that the King has no stirrups and there was a rumour that Sir Richard was so distort at forgetting the stirrups that he hanged himself.  The rumour was untrue as Sir Richard lived to a ripe old age.  The absence of the stirrups is more likely  due to the fact that the statue is in the Roman style, where Roman horsemen did not use stirrups.

IMG_8857 aWindsor Castle from the River Thames

One of the best views of Windsor Castle is from the River Thames.

I have very much enjoyed putting this brief sketch of The Long Walk and Windsor Castle together.  I hope to visit Windsor again shortly to make more images from within the walls of Windsor Castle, which I will publish in my blog in due course.

Prints of all the above images are available with mounts that will fit standard frames – A4 prints at £10.00 each plus £3.00 P & P and A3 prints at £20.00 plus £3.00 P & P.  Please contact me via my contact page if you would like to order.

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